FAST: The Acronym Every Senior and Everyone Who Is Around Seniors Should Know

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a stroke happens every 40 seconds. They take the lives of over 140,000 Americans every year—at the pace of 1 person every 4 minutes.

Seniors are more prone to strokes, and quick medical treatment is absolutely necessary to increase survival. What does FAST have to do with strokes? Here’s what you need to know.

Early Action

The chances that you will survive a stroke increase when you receive emergency treatment as soon as possible. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that people who get treatment within 3 hours of the first symptoms of a stroke experience less disability than those who receive delayed care.

The CDC also reports that nearly 75% of all strokes occur in people over the age of 65, making it the 5th leading cause of death in our country. The American Heart Association reports that while the percentage of strokes has increased as a result of heart disease, the actual number of stroke deaths has declined. This is largely due to FAST.

What is a Stroke?

Strokes occur when the blood flow to a certain area of the brain gets cut off. The cells in this area of the brain begin to die because they are starved of oxygen. The resulting damage causes loss of muscle control or memory. Serious strokes are fatal.

Here’s the thing about a stroke: they may not be obvious. Television and movies may be entertaining, but they aren’t always realistic. Transient ischemic attacks—also known as mini strokes—have symptoms that are short-lived or may even spontaneously resolve.

FAST

There are 4 common signs of a stroke, and that’s where FAST comes in. These symptoms often appear suddenly, so if you see them in a senior—or someone of any age—it’s important to get immediate medical help.

  • Face: Ask them to smile. Does it appear uneven?
  • Arms: Ask them to raise both arms and hold them level to the floor. Does one arm drift downwards?
  • Speech: Ask them to repeat a simple phrase, like “Let’s have tacos for lunch today.” Do they slur their words, or maybe even miss a few?
  • Time: This isn’t a symptom—it’s a reminder of what to do. Fast medical treatment is crucial. It’s time to call for emergency medical help.

Make a note of the time if you should happen to notice any of the FAST symptoms. This piece of information is important to medical professionals. Clot-busting drugs called tissue plasminogen activators reduce long-term disability for certain kinds of strokes. This type of medication, however, is approved for stroke treatment only if given within 3 hours of the onset of symptoms.

Helpful Tips for Hearing Impaired Seniors

Age isn’t the only thing that can impair our hearing, but as we grow older it’s a common occurrence. It’s frustrating—for both those who can no longer hear well, and for those who are their caregivers.

Older adults who experience hearing loss often struggle with everyday things we take for granted, such as knowing when there’s someone at the door, reacting to threatening situations like smoke alarms, or even everyday conversations. Here are some ways to help them—and yourself if you care for someone who needs to hear what’s going on around them.

Start With Developing the Right Attitude

It’s not their fault. Hearing impairment as we age is caused by physical changes in our ears. It can also be caused by damage to the auditory nerve, or even the ability for the brain to process sound. It can be one of these, or a combination of all three.

There are also at least 200 common medications which are known as “ototoxic.” This means that they affect our ability to hear. The primary sign of an ototoxic reaction to a medication is often tinnitus, or ringing in your ears. It’s important to seek out medical advice if you suspect that medications may be the cause of hearing impairment.

In almost all cases, hearing loss is a physical thing. Unfortunately, it also has psychological and emotional impacts. First of all, it’s embarrassing. People handle this kind of frustration in different ways. Seniors may become angry or agitated because of a hearing impairment. Or, they may become distant and less responsive to what’s happening around them because it’s just too difficult to distinguish what they’re hearing.

This hearing impairment can also affect caregivers. It can be extremely frustrating and exhausting to constantly repeat what’s been said. This is why it’s crucial to remember that you’re dealing with something that’s a constant source of frustration for seniors with hearing impairment. 

The Answer Isn’t Always Hearing Aids

These medical devices can make an amazing difference. Today’s digital instruments go far beyond just amplifying general sound. After a thorough test, the hearing aids are “tuned” to amplify only the frequencies that the wearer can no longer hear.

While the technology has improved, the cost of quality hearing aids remains expensive. It’s not uncommon to pay thousands of dollars per hearing aid. Some medical insurance policies will cover some of the cost.

The devices are meant to be small and unobtrusive—which means that they might not be an optimal solution for some seniors. Others just don’t want to be bothered with the care and maintenance of hearing aids. Many of the devices require frequent battery changes. Those batteries are very small and might prove impossible for seniors to work with.

So, while this might be a primary approach, it could prove impractical.

Other Options

Thanks to other technologies—and the growth of the number of companies creating products for our growing senior population—there are simple and inexpensive devices that can be integrated into everyday situations which can help seniors use other senses to compensate for hearing impairment.

There’s a profusion of wireless doorbell kits you can buy that add a flashing light to alert you when someone rings the doorbell.

If you have a landline phone connection—and many of us still do—you can purchase a signaler that plugs into the phone jack. It will flash a light to alert you when there’s an incoming call.

You may have seen them in public buildings. When a fire alarm goes off, the devices also flash with a strobe. This technology has made it into home smoke detectors. Most are as simple to install as putting in a battery and hanging it up on the wall.

We’re all susceptible to losing our hearing, and it’s something that many seniors must live with. Thanks to the concept of mixing visual cues with audio, many of the things seniors thought they would have to tune out are now available to them again.

Just What Is a Residential Care Home, Anyway?

There are a growing number of options for senior citizens when they reach the point where it’s not wise to be without assistance. The most obvious option is a nursing home, but that really may not be necessary yet.

Many seniors simply need some help. For them, there’s the option of a residential care home. Here’s what a residential care home is, and why this option deserves your consideration.

Right Under Your Nose

Is your idea of a nursing home a large building on a grassy campus somewhere out in the country? That description may fit a number of nursing homes, but you’ll generally find them scattered in both urban and suburban areas.

What might surprise you about residential care homes is that you’ll find them right in the middle of residential neighborhoods. There could be one not far from your home. That’s because residential care homes are exactly what their names say. They are private residential homes that that provide care to small groups of senior citizens. The size of the home determines how many seniors reside there. In California where residential care homes are plentiful, most have 6 or less residents.

Less, But More

Traditional nursing homes generally provide high levels of care for residents, provided by skilled nursing professionals. Assisted living facilities offer the least care for residents. Residential care homes tend to fall in between. They offer more comprehensive and personalized care because the staff is responsible for just a few residents.

Residential care homes can offer high levels of care for chronically ill seniors, or they may offer only general supervision and help with the activities of daily living. It’s up to the owners, and it’s why it’s important to find out exactly what a residential care home’s range of services is before you make a decision.

Best For

People often ask who would enjoy or benefit most from living in a residential care home. They are a wise option for seniors who strongly oppose the idea of a large, institutional type of living situation such as a nursing home.

Residential care homes offer older adults the ability to live relatively independent lives. They may not be able to live completely on their own, but they still value the ability to make decisions about things like shopping, dining out, going for walks, or even having friends and family visit.

Older adults with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia also benefit from living in a residential care home. Living in a smaller place, say, the size of a residential home, can cause less anxiety and stress. Residents also get more personalized care because staff members get to know their specific needs.

They say you can’t pick the family you’re born into—but as you grow older you can select a group of people to live with who can surround you with the benefits of a family. That’s the idea behind a residential care home.